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  • VIQC Next Level Game Manual Updates

    This thread will be used to publish updates to the VIQC Next Level Game Manual. For any official questions, please visit the VIQC Next Level Q&A.

  • #2
    On June 15, 2018, the following updates were made to the VIQC Next Level Game Manual. This update included a number of "blue boxes", which will be used to provide additional clarification or explanation beyond the verbiage of a given rule.


    1. The definition of Floor was appended to clarify that the blue terrain pieces are considered part of the Floor.

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    2. The definition of Low Scored was updated to clarify which Hubs receive points when there are more than four Hubs in a given Building Zone.

    Teams can receive points for a maximum of four (4) Low Scored Hubs in each Building Zone. If there are more than four (4) Low Scored Hubs in a Building Zone, points are awarded for the four (4) Low Scored Hubs that would receive the most points (e.g. any Bonus Hubs).
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    3. The definition of High Scored was updated to clarify what is meant by "within" a Building Zone, and to explain how to handle High Scored Hubs when there are more than four Low Scored Hubs.

    Hub is High Scored at the end of a Match if it meets the following criteria:
    1. The Hub is completely or partially within the 3D volume of a Building Zone.
    2. The Hub is not contacting the Floor or a Barrier.
    3. The Hub is not contacting a Robot.
    4. The Hub is contacting at least one Hub that would be considered Scored.
    a. Note: Low Scored Hubs that do not receive points (due to the Note above) may still be considered Scored for the purposes of point 4. Thus, contacting a Low Scored Hub that did not receive points still satisfies this requirement.
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    4. A blue box was added to provide some guidance for determining if a Hub is Scored or not.

    When trying to determine if a Hub is Scored or not, you can usually ask these questions: • Is the Hub contacting a Robot, or the Floor outside of the Building Zone? If not, then we need to ask a few more questions to determine if it is Low Scored or High Scored.
    • Is the Hub touching a Barrier or the Floor within the Building Zone? If so, then the Hub is Low Scored.
    • If the Hub is not touching a Barrier or the Floor, is the Hub touching a Low or High Scored Hub, and within (fully or partially) the 3D volume of a Building Zone? If so, then the Hub is High Scored.
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    5. Figures 6, 8, and 9 were added to provide some guidance for Scoring edge cases. Figure 10 was added to provide an example match scoring.

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    6. A blue box was added to <G2> to provide some clarification on what is meant by "student-centered program".

    Some amount of adult mentorship, teaching, and/or guidance is an expected and encouraged facet of the VEX IQ Challenge. No one is born an expert in robotics! However, obstacles should always be viewed as teaching opportunities, not tasks for an adult to solve without Students present and actively participating.

    When a mechanism falls off, it is…
    …okay for an adult to help a Student investigate why it failed, so it can be improved.
    …not okay for an adult to put the robot back together.
    When a team encounters a complex programming concept, it is…
    …okay for an adult to guide a Student through a flowchart to understand its logic.
    …not okay for an adult to write a pre-made command for that Student to reference.
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    7. Figure 11 was modified to more clearly depict the Starting Positions.

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    8. <G17> was modified to clarify what is and is not considered "lifting" more than one Hub off of the Floor at a time.

    Robots may not directly or indirectly lift or hold more than one (1) Hub off of the Floor at a time. Pushing, shoving, pulling, or plowing multiple Hubs along the Floor, field perimeter, or Field Elements (e.g. Barriers) is not considered a violation, as long as these Hubs remain in contact with the Floor. However, if a Robot controls multiple Hubs that are not in contact with the Floor (such as pushing a Hub with two Hubs stacked on top of it), this would be a violation.
    <G17> also recevied a blue box to explain this further:

    This rule primarily refers to Robots which lift Hubs off of the Floor. Any mechanisms which are designed to lift Hubs can only do so one Hub at a time. If you design your Robot to only lift one Hub at a time, you will probably not violate this rule.
    The key part of this rule is “off of the Floor”. Robots may manipulate multiple Hubs, so long as it is clear to the referee that they have remained in contact with the Floor.
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    9. <R2> received a blue box to explain that teams should build and compete with their own robots.

    The intent of <R2a>, <R2b>, and <R2c> are to ensure an unambiguous level playing field for all teams. Teams are welcome (and encouraged) to improve or modify their robots between events, or to collaborate with other teams to develop the best possible game solution.

    However, a team who brings and/or competes with two separate robots at the same tournament has diminished the efforts of a team who spent extra design time making sure that their one robot can accomplish all of the game’s tasks. A multi-team organization that shares a single robot has diminished the efforts of a multi-team organization who puts in the time, effort, and resources to undergo separate individual design processes and develop their own robots.

    To help determine if a robot is a “separate robot” or not, use the Subsystem definitions found in <R2>. Above that, use common sense as referenced in <G2>. If you can place two robots on a table next to each other, and they look like two separate (legal/complete) robots, then they are two separate robots. Trying to decide if changing a pin, a wheel, or a motor constitutes a separate robot is missing the intent and spirit of this rule.
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    10. Match Stop Time was added as a way to break ties for first place.

    Match Stop Time – The time remaining (i.e. displayed on the timer or audience display) in a tiebreaker Finals Match when an Alliance ends the Match early by placing their controllers on the ground. The Match Stop Time is rounded down to the nearest even number. For example, if controllers are set down when the displayed time is 13 seconds, the Match Stop Time is recorded as 12 seconds. If an Alliance does not finish the Match early, they receive a default Match Stop Time of 0 seconds.
    If there is a tie for first place, the tied Alliances will each play one tiebreaker Match. The Alliance with the highest score in their tiebreaker Match will be declared the winner.
    * If there is a tie in the tiebreaker Matches, the Alliance with the higher Match Stop Time will be declared the winner.
    * If there is a tie and both Alliances have the same Match Stop Time, a second set of tiebreaker Matches (one (1) per Alliance) will take place. This Match will follow the same logic as the first tiebreaker Match (i.e. the highest score, or the highest Match Stop Time in the event of a tie, will be declared the winner).
    <T5> If an Alliance wants to end a Qualifying Match or a Finals Match early, both Teams should signal the referee by placing their controllers on the ground. The referee will then signal to the Teams that the Match is over and will begin to tally the score. a. If the Match is a tiebreaker Finals Match, then the Match Stop Time will also be recorded.
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    A number of minor typos were fixed, such as adding metric measurements and changing "nonfunctional" to "non-functional".

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    • #3
      On August 17, 2018, the following changes were made to the VEX IQ Challenge Game Manual.

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      1. Figure 10 was updated to correctly reflect the points received for Removing Bonus Hubs from Bonus Pegs.

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      2. <G6> was revised to clarify that Students may only Drive for one Team.

      <G6> Drivers switch Controllers midway through the Match. Each team shall include two Drivers. Teams with only one Student in attendance at an event are granted an allowance to use another qualified Driver from the event. No Student may fulfill the role of Driver for more than one Team at a given event, or in a given season.
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      3. <G10> was modified to provide additional clarification on how the end of a Match should be handled.

      <G10> When it’s over, it’s over. Scores will be calculated for all Matches immediately after the Match is complete and once all Robots and Game Objects on the Field come to rest. Any Scoring, Removing, Parking, or Hanging that takes place after the Match due to Robots continuing to drive will not count.

      a. Referees or other event staff are not allowed to review videos or pictures from the Match.
      b. If there is a concern regarding the score of a Match, only the Drivers from that Match, not an adult, may share their questions with the referee.
      c. This rule’s intent is for Driver inputs and Robot motion to cease at the end of the Match. A Robot that uses a brake mode to hold its position (such as to remain Hanging) would be fine.
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      4. A guideline was added to the Teamwork Challenge Finals Matches section on how tiebreaker matches should be logistically handled.

      If there is a tie for first place, the tied Alliances will each play one tiebreaker Match. The lower seeded Alliance will play their Match first, followed by the higher seeded Alliance. The Alliance with the highest score in their tiebreaker Match will be declared the winner.

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